Fear? No! Perseverance!

Star Magnolia

Star Magnolia

“Of the many interesting facts about the magnolia flower, the most striking one is that it is a very old flower. In fact, there are fossils dating back 20 million years that show that the flower has been gracing Earth since the very beginning of time, so to say. The magnolia is also a very tough, hard flower, unlike other delicate flowers. This is owing to the fact that it has had to adapt to changing climactic and geological conditions in order to survive, and it is precisely due to this feature that the flower represents endurance, eternity, and long life.” _ Buzzle.

The Magnolia means Endurance or Perseverance.

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear — not absence of fear.” – Mark Twain

Why do I link endurance and perseverance to courage and fear?  Because, I went to a presentation by Beth Fitzgerald Allen of DIY Hip Chicks today.  She is an inspiration and her message of “flushing” fear was so motivating.  The history and meaning of the Magnolia reminded me of Beth’s presentation.  Beth stated ” Courage is not the absence of fear, but the ability to move forward any way” – reminding me of Mark Twain (above).

  We all must endure, persevere, and push forward despite of our fears if we are going to accomplish our goals and achieve success and joy.

Signs of Spring

Signs of Spring

Signs of Spring

SS 1/60 f 5.6 ISO 400

Post processing: a slight curves adjustment in Photoshop CC.

Signs of Spring was shot in diffused light in between rain showers; – April showers bring May flowers -. I used a shallow depth of field to achieve a more abstract composition. I made the shadowed areas less in focus to give a more quizzical appearance of the flower.

Can you guess what the rain drops fell on? I’ll give you a hint – they are some of the first signs of Spring on the North East Coast and provide much-needed color to dull, early Spring landscapes.

To see this image in black and white visit Monochromia, a black and white photo blog I proudly, yet humbly, contribute to every Thursday.

I’d love to hear which you prefer – the monochromatic image or the color image.

Tulip I

Tulip I

Tulip I, a Day Dream

SS 1/60 F 4.5 ISO 640

Tulip I is the first image in my 2015 tulip series. I used natural light to photograph several tulips that were decaying. Tulip I is a day-dream. I used back lighting, ambient light, and a shallow depth of field to achieve the swirly, dreamy effect.

In post processing I did a simple curves adjustment, just to give a little color pop.

Blue

 

Blue

Blue

ss 0.8 f 22 iso 100

“No water, no life. No blue, no green.” – Sylvia Earle

This image was taken during the evening blue hour on the Pacific Coast in February.  The “blue hour” refers to the period of twilight every morning and evening when the sun is below the horizon and the indirect sunlight takes on a predominantly blue hue with a cool color temperature.

To learn more about the blue hour, the golden hour and twilight feel free to read this great article by PetaPixel.

Remember, tomorrow is Thursday and I will be posting a black and white image on Monochromia.  Be sure to stop by!

Easter Delights

Easter Delights I

Easter Delights I

Easter Delights II

Easter Delights II

Easter Delights III

Easter Delights III

Wishing  you a blessed and happy Easter!

Pure Mystery

To see the mystery…visit Monochromia for my Thursday post.  I hope you enjoy!

 

Dazzled by Your Charms – how to layer two images

Layered Reflections

Dazzled by Your Charms

The Ranunculus flower means “Dazzled by Your Charms” in the Victorian Language of flowers. When shooting a bouquet of Ranunculus one day, I was playing around with different compositions and angles – keeping it simple and minimal as the flower speaks for herself.   In post processing, however, I decided to have a little fun with the images.  The image above is a combination of two images.  The first, was the Ranunculus on the left side of the frame, which I converted to black and white using Topaz Suites.  For the second image, the Ranunculus was on the right side of the frame and I left it in color.  When thinking about the meaning of the flower, I decided to merge the two images so that the flowers look as though they are truly dazzled by the charm of the other.

Creating a Layered Image in Photoshop CC

To create an image with multiple layers or multiple images, you simply open both images in Photoshop.  Decide which image you want to use as the top layer.  Open that image file and go to the menu bar and choose “Select All”.

Once the image has been selected, go to “Edit” and select “Copy”.

Then open the image file that you are going to use for your base layer.

Go to “Edit” and select “Paste”.

The top layer may not be seen in its entirety – you will have to fit it to the image below.  To do so, got to “Edit” once more and select “Free Transform”.   This will enable you to drag the image into place.

Once you have the top layer situated over the base layer, change the opacity by using the opacity slider in the “Essentials”menu bar.

Once your opacity is where you can see both layers to your liking, hit the check mark at the top of the menu bar.  Add your watermark and save your image.

Have fun creating new layered images…if you post any, please be sure to tag Robyn Graham Photography so that I can enjoy your work.